Deep Rotation Equivariant Network (DREN) google
Recently, learning equivariant representations has attracted considerable research attention. Dieleman et al. introduce four operations which can be inserted to CNN to learn deep representations equivariant to rotation. However, feature maps should be copied and rotated four times in each layer in their approach, which causes much running time and memory overhead. In order to address this problem, we propose Deep Rotation Equivariant Network(DREN) consisting of cycle layers, isotonic layers and decycle layers.Our proposed layers apply rotation transformation on filters rather than feature maps, achieving a speed up of more than 2 times with even less memory overhead. We evaluate DRENs on Rotated MNIST and CIFAR-10 datasets and demonstrate that it can improve the performance of state-of-the-art architectures. Our codes are released on GitHub. …

Semantic Matching google
Semantic matching is a technique used in computer science to identify information which is semantically related. Given any two graph-like structures, e.g. classifications, taxonomies database or XML schemas and ontologies, matching is an operator which identifies those nodes in the two structures which semantically correspond to one another. For example, applied to file systems it can identify that a folder labeled “car” is semantically equivalent to another folder “automobile” because they are synonyms in English. This information can be taken from a linguistic resource like WordNet. In the recent years many of them have been offered. S-Match is an example of a semantic matching operator. It works on lightweight ontologies, namely graph structures where each node is labeled by a natural language sentence, for example in English. These sentences are translated into a formal logical formula (according to an artificial unambiguous language) codifying the meaning of the node taking into account its position in the graph. For example, in case the folder “car” is under another folder “red” we can say that the meaning of the folder “car” is “red car” in this case. This is translated into the logical formula “red AND car”. The output of S-Match is a set of semantic correspondences called mappings attached with one of the following semantic relations: disjointness (⊥), equivalence (≡), more specific (⊑) and less specific (⊒). In our example the algorithm will return a mapping between ”car” and ”automobile” attached with an equivalence relation. Information semantically matched can also be used as a measure of relevance through a mapping of near-term relationships. Such use of S-Match technology is prevalent in the career space where it is used to gauge depth of skills through relational mapping of information found in applicant resumes. Semantic matching represents a fundamental technique in many applications in areas such as resource discovery, data integration, data migration, query translation, peer to peer networks, agent communication, schema and ontology merging. It using is also being investigated in other areas such as event processing. In fact, it has been proposed as a valid solution to the semantic heterogeneity problem, namely managing the diversity in knowledge. Interoperability among people of different cultures and languages, having different viewpoints and using different terminology has always been a huge problem. Especially with the advent of the Web and the consequential information explosion, the problem seems to be emphasized. People face the concrete problem to retrieve, disambiguate and integrate information coming from a wide variety of sources. …

Waterfall Plot google
A waterfall plot is a three-dimensional plot in which multiple curves of data, typically spectra, are displayed simultaneously. Typically the curves are staggered both across the screen and vertically, with ‘nearer’ curves masking the ones behind. The result is a series of ‘mountain’ shapes that appear to be side by side. The waterfall plot is often used to show how two-dimensional information changes over time or some other variable such as rpm. The term ‘waterfall plot’ is sometimes used interchangeably with ‘spectrogram’ or ‘Cumulative Spectral Decay’ (CSD) plot. …

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