Paragraph Vector-based Matrix Factorization Recommender System (ParVecMF) google
Review-based recommender systems have gained noticeable ground in recent years. In addition to the rating scores, those systems are enriched with textual evaluations of items by the users. Neural language processing models, on the other hand, have already found application in recommender systems, mainly as a means of encoding user preference data, with the actual textual description of items serving only as side information. In this paper, a novel approach to incorporating the aforementioned models into the recommendation process is presented. Initially, a neural language processing model and more specifically the paragraph vector model is used to encode textual user reviews of variable length into feature vectors of fixed length. Subsequently this information is fused along with the rating scores in a probabilistic matrix factorization algorithm, based on maximum a-posteriori estimation. The resulting system, ParVecMF, is compared to a ratings’ matrix factorization approach on a reference dataset. The obtained preliminary results on a set of two metrics are encouraging and may stimulate further research in this area. …

Message Understanding Conference (MUC) google
The Message Understanding Conferences (MUC) were initiated and financed by DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) to encourage the development of new and better methods of information extraction. The character of this competition—many concurrent research teams competing against one another—required the development of standards for evaluation, e.g. the adoption of metrics like precision and recall. …

Sluice Networks google
Multi-task learning is partly motivated by the observation that humans bring to bear what they know about related problems when solving new ones. Similarly, deep neural networks can profit from related tasks by sharing parameters with other networks. However, humans do not consciously decide to transfer knowledge between tasks (and are typically not aware of the transfer). In machine learning, it is hard to estimate if sharing will lead to improvements; especially if tasks are only loosely related. To overcome this, we introduce Sluice Networks, a general framework for multi-task learning where trainable parameters control the amount of sharing — including which parts of the models to share. Our framework goes beyond and generalizes over previous proposals in enabling hard or soft sharing of all combinations of subspaces, layers, and skip connections. We perform experiments on three task pairs from natural language processing, and across seven different domains, using data from OntoNotes 5.0, and achieve up to 15% average error reductions over common approaches to multi-task learning. We analyze when the architecture is particularly helpful, as well as its ability to fit noise. We show that a) label entropy is predictive of gains in sluice networks, confirming findings for hard parameter sharing, and b) while sluice networks easily fit noise, they are robust across domains in practice. …

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