SWP Operator google
The sweep operator as defined in (Dempster, 1969), commonly referred to as the SWP operator, is a useful tool for a computational statistician working with covariance matrices. In particular, the SWP operator allows a statistician to quickly regress all variables against one specified variable, obtaining OLS estimates for regression coefficients and variances in a single application. Subsequent applications of the SWP operator allows for regressing against more variables. …

Linear-Time Detection of Non-Linear Changes (LIGHT) google
Change detection in multivariate time series has applications in many domains, including health care and network monitoring. A common approach to detect changes is to compare the divergence between the distributions of a reference window and a test window. When the number of dimensions is very large, however, the na¨ıve approach has both quality and efficiency issues: to ensure robustness the window size needs to be large, which not only leads to missed alarms but also increases runtime. To this end, we propose LIGHT, a linear-time algorithm for robustly detecting non-linear changes in massively high dimensional time series. Importantly, LIGHT provides high flexibility in choosing the window size, allowing the domain expert to fit the level of details required. To do such, we 1) perform scalable PCA to reduce dimensionality, 2) perform scalable factorization of the joint distribution, and 3) scalably compute divergences between these lower dimensional distributions. Extensive empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world data show that LIGHT outperforms state of the art with up to 100% improvement in both quality and efficiency. …

Manhattan Distance google
Taxicab geometry, considered by Hermann Minkowski in 19th century Germany, is a form of geometry in which the usual distance function or metric of Euclidean geometry is replaced by a new metric in which the distance between two points is the sum of the absolute differences of their Cartesian coordinates. The taxicab metric is also known as rectilinear distance, L1 distance or norm, city block distance, Manhattan distance, or Manhattan length, with corresponding variations in the name of the geometry. The latter names allude to the grid layout of most streets on the island of Manhattan, which causes the shortest path a car could take between two intersections in the borough to have length equal to the intersections’ distance in taxicab geometry.

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