Inferactive Data Analysis google
We describe inferactive data analysis, so-named to denote an interactive approach to data analysis with an emphasis on inference after data analysis. Our approach is a compromise between Tukey’s exploratory (roughly speaking ‘model free’) and confirmatory data analysis (roughly speaking classical and ‘model based’), also allowing for Bayesian data analysis. We view this approach as close in spirit to current practice of applied statisticians and data scientists while allowing frequentist guarantees for results to be reported in the scientific literature, or Bayesian results where the data scientist may choose the statistical model (and hence the prior) after some initial exploratory analysis. While this approach to data analysis does not cover every scenario, and every possible algorithm data scientists may use, we see this as a useful step in concrete providing tools (with frequentist statistical guarantees) for current data scientists. The basis of inference we use is selective inference [Lee et al., 2016, Fithian et al., 2014], in particular its randomized form [Tian and Taylor, 2015a]. The randomized framework, besides providing additional power and shorter confidence intervals, also provides explicit forms for relevant reference distributions (up to normalization) through the {\em selective sampler} of Tian et al. [2016]. The reference distributions are constructed from a particular conditional distribution formed from what we call a DAG-DAG — a Data Analysis Generative DAG. As sampling conditional distributions in DAGs is generally complex, the selective sampler is crucial to any practical implementation of inferactive data analysis. Our principal goal is in reviewing the recent developments in selective inference as well as describing the general philosophy of selective inference. …

Fence Methods google
This method is a new class of model selection strategies, for mixed model selection, which includes linear and generalized linear mixed models. The idea involves a procedure to isolate a subgroup of what are known as correct models (of which the optimal model is a member). This is accomplished by constructing a statistical fence, or barrier, to carefully eliminate incorrect models. Once the fence is constructed, the optimal model is selected from among those within the fence according to a criterion which can be made flexible. References: 1. Jiang J., Rao J.S., Gu Z., Nguyen T. (2008), Fence Methods for Mixed Model Selection. The Annals of Statistics, 36(4): 1669-1692. <DOI:10.1214/07-AOS517> <https://…/1216237296>. 2. Jiang J., Nguyen T., Rao J.S. (2009), A Simplified Adaptive Fence Procedure. Statistics and Probability Letters, 79, 625-629. <DOI:10.1016/j.spl.2008.10.014> <https://…A_simplified_adaptive_fence_procedure> 3. Jiang J., Nguyen T., Rao J.S. (2010), Fence Method for Nonparametric Small Area Estimation. Survey Methodology, 36(1), 3-11. <http://…/12-001-x2010001-eng.pdf>. 4. Jiming Jiang, Thuan Nguyen and J. Sunil Rao (2011), Invisible fence methods and the identification of differentially expressed gene sets. Statistics and Its Interface, Volume 4, 403-415. <http://…/SII-2011-0004-0003-a014.pdf>. 5. Thuan Nguyen & Jiming Jiang (2012), Restricted fence method for covariate selection in longitudinal data analysis. Biostatistics, 13(2), 303-314. <DOI:10.1093/biostatistics/kxr046> <https://…ce-method-for-covariate-selection-in>. 6. Thuan Nguyen, Jie Peng, Jiming Jiang (2014), Fence Methods for Backcross Experiments. Statistical Computation and Simulation, 84(3), 644-662. <DOI:10.1080/00949655.2012.721885> <https://…/>. 7. Jiang, J. (2014), The fence methods, in Advances in Statistics, Hindawi Publishing Corp., Cairo. <DOI:10.1155/2014/830821>. 8. Jiming Jiang and Thuan Nguyen (2015), The Fence Methods, World Scientific, Singapore. <https://…/plp>.

shuttleNet google
Despite a lot of research efforts devoted in recent years, how to efficiently learn long-term dependencies from sequences still remains a pretty challenging task. As one of the key models for sequence learning, recurrent neural network (RNN) and its variants such as long short term memory (LSTM) and gated recurrent unit (GRU) are still not powerful enough in practice. One possible reason is that they have only feedforward connections, which is different from biological neural network that is typically composed of both feedforward and feedback connections. To address the problem, this paper proposes a biologically-inspired RNN structure, called shuttleNet, by introducing loop connections in the network and utilizing parameter sharing to prevent overfitting. Unlike the traditional RNNs, the cells of shuttleNet are loop connected to mimic the brain’s feedforward and feedback connections. The structure is then stretched in the depth dimension to generate a deeper model with multiple information flow paths, while the parameters are shared so as to prevent shuttleNet from being over-fitting. The attention mechanism is then applied to select the best information path. The extensive experiments are conducted on two datasets for action recognition: UCF101 and HMDB51. We find that our model can outperform LSTMs and GRUs remarkably. Even only replacing the LSTMs with our shuttleNet in a CNN-RNN network, we can still achieve the state-of-the-art performance on both datasets. …

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