Graph Convolutional Networks google
Many important real-world datasets come in the form of graphs or networks: social networks, knowledge graphs, protein-interaction networks, the World Wide Web, etc. (just to name a few). Yet, until recently, very little attention has been devoted to the generalization of neural network models to such structured datasets. In the last couple of years, a number of papers re-visited this problem of generalizing neural networks to work on arbitrarily structured graphs (Bruna et al., ICLR 2014; Henaff et al., 2015; Duvenaud et al., NIPS 2015; Li et al., ICLR 2016; Defferrard et al., NIPS 2016; Kipf & Welling, ICLR 2017), some of them now achieving very promising results in domains that have previously been dominated by, e.g., kernel-based methods, graph-based regularization techniques and others. …

OpenTSDB google
OpenTSDB is a distributed, scalable Time Series Database (TSDB) written on top of HBase. OpenTSDB was written to address a common need: store, index and serve metrics collected from computer systems (network gear, operating systems, applications) at a large scale, and make this data easily accessible and graphable. Thanks to HBase’s scalability, OpenTSDB allows you to collect thousands of metrics from tens of thousands of hosts and applications, at a high rate (every few seconds). OpenTSDB will never delete or downsample data and can easily store hundreds of billions of data points. OpenTSDB is free software and is available under both LGPLv2.1+ and GPLv3+. Find more about OpenTSDB at http://opentsdb.net

Longitudinal Study google
A longitudinal survey is a correlational research study that involves repeated observations of the same variables over long periods of time — often many decades. It is a type of observational study. Longitudinal studies are often used in psychology to study developmental trends across the life span, and in sociology to study life events throughout lifetimes or generations. The reason for this is that, unlike cross-sectional studies, in which different individuals with same characteristics are compared, longitudinal studies track the same people, and therefore the differences observed in those people are less likely to be the result of cultural differences across generations. Because of this benefit, longitudinal studies make observing changes more accurate, and they are applied in various other fields. In medicine, the design is used to uncover predictors of certain diseases. In advertising, the design is used to identify the changes that advertising has produced in the attitudes and behaviors of those within the target audience who have seen the advertising campaign. Because most longitudinal studies are observational, in the sense that they observe the state of the world without manipulating it, it has been argued that they may have less power to detect causal relationships than experiments. But because of the repeated observation at the individual level, they have more power than cross-sectional observational studies, by virtue of being able to exclude time-invariant unobserved individual differences, and by virtue of observing the temporal order of events. Some of the disadvantages of longitudinal study include the fact that they take a lot of time and are very expensive. Therefore, they are not very convenient. Longitudinal studies allow social scientists to distinguish short from long-term phenomena, such as poverty. If the poverty rate is 10% at a point in time, this may mean that 10% of the population are always poor, or that the whole population experiences poverty for 10% of the time. It is impossible to conclude which of these possibilities is the case using one-off cross-sectional studies. Types of longitudinal studies include cohort studies and panel studies. Cohort studies sample a cohort, defined as a group experiencing some event (typically birth) in a selected time period, and studying them at intervals through time. Panel studies sample a cross-section, and survey it at (usually regular) intervals. A retrospective study is a longitudinal study that looks back in time. For instance, a researcher may look up the medical records of previous years to look for a trend. …

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