A Non-Expert’s Guide to Image Segmentation Using Deep Neural Nets

In this post, I’ll walk through how we can use the current state-of-the-art in deep learning to try and solve this problem. I’m not an expert in machine learning myself, so my hope is that this post will be useful to other non-experts looking to use this powerful new tool.


Sentiment analysis methods for understanding large-scale texts: a case for using continuum-scored words and word shift graphs

The emergence and global adoption of social media has rendered possible the real-time estimation of population-scale sentiment, an extraordinary capacity which has profound implications for our understanding of human behavior. Given the growing assortment of sentiment-measuring instruments, it is imperative to understand which aspects of sentiment dictionaries contribute to both their classification accuracy and their ability to provide richer understanding of texts. Here, we perform detailed, quantitative tests and qualitative assessments of 6 dictionary-based methods applied to 4 different corpora, and briefly examine a further 20 methods. We show that while inappropriate for sentences, dictionary-based methods are generally robust in their classification accuracy for longer texts. Most importantly they can aid understanding of texts with reliable and meaningful word shift graphs if (1) the dictionary covers a sufficiently large portion of a given text’s lexicon when weighted by word usage frequency; and (2) words are scored on a continuous scale.


Making a Shiny dashboard using ‘highcharter’ – Analyzing Inflation Rates

Shiny is an amazing R package which lets the R developers and users build amazing web apps using R itself. It lets the R users analyze, visualize and deploy their machine learning models directly in the form of the web app. This package lets you host standalone apps on a webpage or embed them in R markdown documents or build dashboards and various forecasting applications. You can also extend your Shiny apps with CSS themes, htmlwidgets, and JavaScript actions. Shiny lets us write client-side front-end code in R itself and also lets users write server-side script in R itself. More details on this package can be found here.


Word Vectors with tidy data principles

Last week I saw Chris Moody’s post on the Stitch Fix blog about calculating word vectors from a corpus of text using word counts and matrix factorization, and I was so excited! This blog post illustrates how to implement that approach to find word vector representations in R using tidy data principles and sparse matrices.
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