Optimization google
In mathematics, computer science, economics, or management science, mathematical optimization (alternatively, optimization or mathematical programming) is the selection of a best element (with regard to some criteria) from some set of available alternatives. In the simplest case, an optimization problem consists of maximizing or minimizing a real function by systematically choosing input values from within an allowed set and computing the value of the function. The generalization of optimization theory and techniques to other formulations comprises a large area of applied mathematics. More generally, optimization includes finding ‘best available’ values of some objective function given a defined domain (or a set of constraints), including a variety of different types of objective functions and different types of domains. …

Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS,MIIV-2SLS) google
Two-Stage least squares (2SLS) regression analysis is a statistical technique that is used in the analysis of structural equations. This technique is the extension of the OLS method. It is used when the dependent variable’s error terms are correlated with the independent variables. Additionally, it is useful when there are feedback loops in the model. In structural equations modeling, we use the maximum likelihood method to estimate the path coefficient. This technique is an alternative in SEM modeling to estimate the path coefficient. This technique can also be applied in quasi-experimental studies. …

SLING google
SLING, an experimental system for parsing natural language text directly into a representation of its meaning as a semantic frame graph. The output frame graph directly captures the semantic annotations of interest to the user, while avoiding the pitfalls of pipelined systems by not running any intermediate stages, additionally preventing unnecessary computation. SLING uses a special-purpose recurrent neural network model to compute the output representation of input text through incremental editing operations on the frame graph. The frame graph, in turn, is flexible enough to capture many semantic tasks of interest (more on this below). SLING’s parser is trained using only the input words, bypassing the need for producing any intermediate annotations (e.g. dependency parses). …

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