DyNet google
We describe DyNet, a toolkit for implementing neural network models based on dynamic declaration of network structure. In the static declaration strategy that is used in toolkits like Theano, CNTK, and TensorFlow, the user first defines a computation graph (a symbolic representation of the computation), and then examples are fed into an engine that executes this computation and computes its derivatives. In DyNet’s dynamic declaration strategy, computation graph construction is mostly transparent, being implicitly constructed by executing procedural code that computes the network outputs, and the user is free to use different network structures for each input. Dynamic declaration thus facilitates the implementation of more complicated network architectures, and DyNet is specifically designed to allow users to implement their models in a way that is idiomatic in their preferred programming language (C++ or Python). One challenge with dynamic declaration is that because the symbolic computation graph is defined anew for every training example, its construction must have low overhead. To achieve this, DyNet has an optimized C++ backend and lightweight graph representation. Experiments show that DyNet’s speeds are faster than or comparable with static declaration toolkits, and significantly faster than Chainer, another dynamic declaration toolkit. DyNet is released open-source under the Apache 2.0 license and available at http://…/dynet.

Metzler Matrix google
In mathematics, a Metzler matrix is a matrix in which all the off-diagonal components are nonnegative (equal to or greater than zero). It is named after the American economist Lloyd Metzler. Metzler matrices appear in stability analysis of time delayed differential equations and positive linear dynamical systems. Their properties can be derived by applying the properties of nonnegative matrices to matrices of the form M + aI where M is a Metzler matrix. …

Kalman Filter google
Kalman filtering, also known as linear quadratic estimation (LQE), is an algorithm that uses a series of measurements observed over time, containing noise (random variations) and other inaccuracies, and produces estimates of unknown variables that tend to be more precise than those based on a single measurement alone. More formally, the Kalman filter operates recursively on streams of noisy input data to produce a statistically optimal estimate of the underlying system state. The filter is named after Rudolf (Rudy) E. Kálmán, one of the primary developers of its theory. The Kalman filter has numerous applications in technology. A common application is for guidance, navigation and control of vehicles, particularly aircraft and spacecraft. Furthermore, the Kalman filter is a widely applied concept in time series analysis used in fields such as signal processing and econometrics. Kalman filters also are one of the main topics in the field of Robotic motion planning and control, and sometimes included in Trajectory optimization.
“Extended Kalman Filter”
Kalman Filter For Dummies
Understanding the Basis of the Kalman Filter via a Simple and Intuitive Derivation

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