Competitive Pathway Network (CoPaNet) google
In the design of deep neural architectures, recent studies have demonstrated the benefits of grouping subnetworks into a larger network. For examples, the Inception architecture integrates multi-scale subnetworks and the residual network can be regarded that a residual unit combines a residual subnetwork with an identity shortcut. In this work, we embrace this observation and propose the Competitive Pathway Network (CoPaNet). The CoPaNet comprises a stack of competitive pathway units and each unit contains multiple parallel residual-type subnetworks followed by a max operation for feature competition. This mechanism enhances the model capability by learning a variety of features in subnetworks. The proposed strategy explicitly shows that the features propagate through pathways in various routing patterns, which is referred to as pathway encoding of category information. Moreover, the cross-block shortcut can be added to the CoPaNet to encourage feature reuse. We evaluated the proposed CoPaNet on four object recognition benchmarks: CIFAR-10, CIFAR-100, SVHN, and ImageNet. CoPaNet obtained the state-of-the-art or comparable results using similar amounts of parameters. The code of CoPaNet is available at: https://…/CoPaNet.

Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) google
In computing, Aspect-oriented software development (AOSD) is an emerging software development technology that seeks new modularizations of software systems in order to isolate secondary or supporting functions from the main program’s business logic. AOSD allows multiple concerns to be expressed separately and automatically unified into working systems. Aspect-Oriented Software Development focuses on the identification, specification and representation of cross-cutting concerns and their modularization into separate functional units as well as their automated composition into a working system. …

Metcalfe’s Law google
Metcalfe’s law states that the value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system (n^2). First formulated in this form by George Gilder in 1993, and attributed to Robert Metcalfe in regard to Ethernet, Metcalfe’s law was originally presented, circa 1980, not in terms of users, but rather of ‘compatible communicating devices’ (for example, fax machines, telephones, etc.). Only more recently with the launch of the Internet did this law carry over to users and networks as its original intent was to describe Ethernet purchases and connections. The law is also very much related to economics and business management, especially with competitive companies looking to merge with one another. In the real world, requirements of Pareto efficiency imply that the law will not hold. …

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