Congested Scene Recognition Network (CSRNet) google
We propose a network for Congested Scene Recognition called CSRNet to provide a data-driven and deep learning method that can understand highly congested scenes and perform accurate count estimation as well as present high-quality density maps. The proposed CSRNet is composed of two major components: a convolutional neural network (CNN) as the front-end for 2D feature extraction and a dilated CNN for the back-end, which uses dilated kernels to deliver larger reception fields and to replace pooling operations. CSRNet is an easy-trained model because of its pure convolutional structure. To our best acknowledge, CSRNet is the first implementation using dilated CNNs for crowd counting tasks. We demonstrate CSRNet on four datasets (ShanghaiTech dataset, the UCF_CC_50 dataset, the WorldEXPO’10 dataset, and the UCSD dataset) and we deliver the state-of-the-art performance on all the datasets. In the ShanghaiTech Part_B dataset, we significantly achieve the MAE which is 47.3% lower than the previous state-of-the-art method. We extend the applications for counting other objects, such as the vehicle in TRANCOS dataset. Results show that CSRNet significantly improves the output quality with 15.4% lower MAE than the previous state-of-the-art approach. …

KBGAN google
We introduce an adversarial learning framework, which we named KBGAN, to improve the performances of a wide range of existing knowledge graph embedding models. Because knowledge graph datasets typically only contain positive facts, sampling useful negative training examples is a non-trivial task. Replacing the head or tail entity of a fact with a uniformly randomly selected entity is a conventional method for generating negative facts used by many previous works, but the majority of negative facts generated in this way can be easily discriminated from positive facts, and will contribute little towards the training. Inspired by generative adversarial networks (GANs), we use one knowledge graph embedding model as a negative sample generator to assist the training of our desired model, which acts as the discriminator in GANs. The objective of the generator is to generate difficult negative samples that can maximize their likeliness determined by the discriminator, while the discriminator minimizes its training loss. This framework is independent of the concrete form of generator and discriminator, and therefore can utilize a wide variety of knowledge graph embedding models as its building blocks. In experiments, we adversarially train two translation-based models, TransE and TransD, each with assistance from one of the two probability-based models, DistMult and ComplEx. We evaluate the performances of KBGAN on the link prediction task, using three knowledge base completion datasets: FB15k-237, WN18 and WN18RR. Experimental results show that adversarial training substantially improves the performances of target embedding models under various settings. …

Ray RLLib google
Reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms involve the deep nesting of distinct components, where each component typically exhibits opportunities for distributed computation. Current RL libraries offer parallelism at the level of the entire program, coupling all the components together and making existing implementations difficult to extend, combine, and reuse. We argue for building composable RL components by encapsulating parallelism and resource requirements within individual components, which can be achieved by building on top of a flexible task-based programming model. We demonstrate this principle by building Ray RLLib on top of Ray and show that we can implement a wide range of state-of-the-art algorithms by composing and reusing a handful of standard components. This composability does not come at the cost of performance — in our experiments, RLLib matches or exceeds the performance of highly optimized reference implementations. Ray RLLib is available as part of Ray at https://…/.

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