TANKER google
Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation (NERD) systems have recently been widely researched to deal with the significant growth of the Web. NERD systems are crucial for several Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks such as summarization, understanding, and machine translation. However, there is no standard interface specification, i.e. these systems may vary significantly either for exporting their outputs or for processing the inputs. Thus, when a given company desires to implement more than one NERD system, the process is quite exhaustive and prone to failure. In addition, industrial solutions demand critical requirements, e.g., large-scale processing, completeness, versatility, and licenses. Commonly, these requirements impose a limitation, making good NERD models to be ignored by companies. This paper presents TANKER, a distributed architecture which aims to overcome scalability, reliability and failure tolerance limitations related to industrial needs by combining NERD systems. To this end, TANKER relies on a micro-services oriented architecture, which enables agile development and delivery of complex enterprise applications. In addition, TANKER provides a standardized API which makes possible to combine several NERD systems at once. …

Network-Clustered Multi-Modal Bug Localization (NetML) google
Developers often spend much effort and resources to debug a program. To help the developers debug, numerous information retrieval (IR)-based and spectrum-based bug localization techniques have been devised. IR-based techniques process textual information in bug reports, while spectrum-based techniques process program spectra (i.e., a record of which program elements are executed for each test case). While both techniques ultimately generate a ranked list of program elements that likely contain a bug, they only consider one source of information–either bug reports or program spectra–which is not optimal. In light of this deficiency, this paper presents a new approach dubbed Network-clustered Multi-modal Bug Localization (NetML), which utilizes multi-modal information from both bug reports and program spectra to localize bugs. NetML facilitates an effective bug localization by carrying out a joint optimization of bug localization error and clustering of both bug reports and program elements (i.e., methods). The clustering is achieved through the incorporation of network Lasso regularization, which incentivizes the model parameters of similar bug reports and similar program elements to be close together. To estimate the model parameters of both bug reports and methods, NetML employs an adaptive learning procedure based on Newton method that updates the parameters on a per-feature basis. Extensive experiments on 355 real bugs from seven software systems have been conducted to benchmark NetML against various state-of-the-art localization methods. The results show that NetML surpasses the best-performing baseline by 31.82%, 22.35%, 19.72%, and 19.24%, in terms of the number of bugs successfully localized when a developer inspects the top 1, 5, and 10 methods and Mean Average Precision (MAP), respectively. …

Minimum Description Length (MDL) google
The minimum description length (MDL) principle is a formalization of Occam’s razor in which the best hypothesis for a given set of data is the one that leads to the best compression of the data. MDL was introduced by Jorma Rissanen in 1978. It is an important concept in information theory and computational learning theory. …

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